Trend Following with Michael Covel (general)
Bestselling author Michael Covel is the host of Trend Following Radio with 7+ million listens. Investments, economics, decision-making, human behavior & entrepreneurship--all passionately explored. Guests include Nobel Prize winners Robert Aumann, Angus Deaton, Daniel Kahneman, Harry Markowitz & Vernon Smith. Also: James Altucher, Dan Ariely, Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, Kathleen Eisenhardt, Marc Faber, Tim Ferriss, Jason Fried, Gerd Gigerenzer, Larry Hite, Sally Hogshead, Ryan Holiday, Jack Horner, Ewan Kirk, Steven Kotler, Michael Mauboussin, Tucker Max, Barry Ritholtz, Jim Rogers, Jack Schwager, Ed Seykota, Philip Tetlock & Walter Williams. All 600+ eps at www.trendfollowing.com/podcast.

Wake Up and Think with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio. A special mega episode!

Direct download: 772.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Art Markman is the Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organizations. The HDO program brings the humanities and the social behavioral sciences to people in business. Art’s research explores thinking. He has studied the way people form and use analogies, the mechanisms of decision making, the modes that allow people to form categories, and the influences of motivation on reasoning. Art is also the executive editor of the journal Cognitive Science and is a former executive officer of the Cognitive Science Society.

If you’re in a job interview, how should you think about the mindset of the interviewer? If you’ve just been promoted, how do you handle the tensions of managing former peers? And what are the telltale mental signs that it’s time to start planning your next career move?

We know that psychology can teach us much about behaviors and challenges relevant to work, such as making better decisions, influencing people, and dealing with stress. But many popular books on these topics analyze them as universal human phenomena without providing real-life, constructive career help.

Bring Your Brain to Work changes all that. Art Markman focuses on three essential elements of a successful career–getting a job, excelling at work, and finding your next position–and expertly illustrates how cognitive science, especially psychology, sheds fascinating and useful light on each of these elements.

To succeed at a job interview, for example, you need to understand the mindset of the interviewer and know how to come across as exactly the individual the company wants to hire. To keep that job, it’s critical to master the mental challenge of learning every day. Finally, careers require constant development, so you need to be able to sense when it’s time to move up or out and to prepare yourself for the move. So many of the hurdles you face throughout your career are, first and foremost, psychological challenges, and Markman shows you how to use your different mental systems–motivational, social, and cognitive–to manage them more effectively.

Integrating the latest research with engaging stories and examples from across the professional spectrum, Bring Your Brain to Work gets inside your head, helping you to succeed through a better understanding of yourself and those around you.

Direct download: 771.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Social Control Arrives with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 770.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Jeff Dyer (Ph.D UCLA) is the Horace Beesley professor of strategy at Brigham Young University as well as professor of strategy at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Before becoming a professor he spent five years as a consultant and manager at Bain & Company, a top management consultancy. His book “The Innovator’s DNA: Mastering the Five Skills of Disruptive Innovators”, with Harvard professor Clayton Christensen and MIT professor Hal Gregersen, identifies the behaviors of the world’s best innovators to demonstrate how individuals can enhance their own innovator DNA and increase the innovation capabilities of their organizations.

Today Jeff and Michael discuss his newest book Innovation Capital. You see, great leaders of innovation know that creativity is not enough. They succeed not only on the basis of their ideas, but because they have the vision, reputation, and networks to win the backing needed to commercialize them. It turns out that this quality–called “innovation capital”–is measurably more important for innovation than just being creative.

The authors have spent decades studying how people get great ideas (the subject of The Innovator’s DNA) and how people test and develop those ideas (explored in The Innovator’s Method). Now they share what they’ve learned from a multipronged research program designed to determine how people compete for, and obtain, resources to launch new ideas.

How you can build a personal reputation for innovation. What techniques you can use to amplify your innovation capital. How you can garner attention for your ideas and projects and persuade audiences to support them. What it means to provide visionary leadership and how you can achieve it. Featuring interviews with the superstars of innovation–individuals like Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Elon Musk (Tesla), Marc Benioff (Salesforce), Indra Nooyi (PepsiCo), and Shantanu Narayen (Adobe)–Jeff dives in deep.

Direct download: 769.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Cheerios and Failure with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 768.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

After a lifelong fascination with financial markets, Steve Burns started investing in 1993, and trading his own accounts in 1995. It was love at first trade. A natural teacher with a gift for cutting through the bull and making complex ideas simple, Steve took to blogging and social media by founding New Trader U in 2011.

Since then, New Trader U has attracted hundreds of thousands of visits a month, becoming the go-to resource for people who want to build a strong trading foundation. New Trader U offers an extensive blog resource with more than 1,000 original articles, as well as online courses and best-selling books covering a variety of topics.

Steve and Michael get together once again on the podcast–an ongoing conversation going back to 2013!

Direct download: 767.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Keep Going with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 766.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

David Weinberger is an American technologist, professional speaker, and commentator, probably best known as co-author of the Cluetrain Manifesto (originally a website, and eventually a book, which has been described as “a primer on Internet marketing”). Weinberger’s work focuses on how the Internet is changing human relationships, communication, knowledge and society.

Artificial intelligence, big data, modern science, and the internet are all revealing a fundamental truth: The world is vastly more complex and unpredictable than we’ve allowed ourselves to see. Now that technology is enabling us to take advantage of all the chaos it’s revealing, our understanding of how things happen is changing–and with it our deepest strategies for predicting, preparing for, and managing our world. This affects everything, from how we approach our everyday lives to how we make moral decisions and how we run our businesses.

Take machine learning, which makes better predictions about weather, medical diagnoses, and product performance than we do–but often does so at the expense of our understanding of how it arrived at those predictions. While this can be dangerous, accepting it is also liberating, for it enables us to harness the complexity of an immense amount of data around us. We are also turning to strategies that avoid anticipating the future altogether, such as A/B testing, Minimum Viable Products, open platforms, and user-modifiable video games.

Through stories from history, business, and technology, philosopher and technologist David Weinberger finds the unifying truths lying below the surface of the tools we take for granted–and a future in which our best strategy often requires holding back from anticipating and instead creating as many possibilities as we can. The book’s imperative for business and beyond is simple: Make. More. Future. The result is a world no longer focused on limitations but optimized for possibilities.

Direct download: 765.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

A Beijing Journey with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio. You have not been yet? Go. See it.

Direct download: 764.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Based on eight years of research visiting dozens of startups, tech companies and incumbents, Harvard Business School professor Thales Teixeira shows how and why consumer industries are disrupted, and what established companies can do about it—while highlighting the specific strategies potential startups use to gain a competitive edge.

There is a pattern to digital disruption in an industry, whether the disruptor is Uber, Airbnb, Dollar Shave Club, Pillpack or one of countless other startups that have stolen large portions of market share from industry leaders, often in a matter of a few years.

As Teixeira makes clear, the nature of competition has fundamentally changed. Using innovative new business models, startups are stealing customers by breaking the links in how consumers discover, buy and use products and services. By decoupling the customer value chain, these startups, instead of taking on the Unilevers and Nikes, BMW’s and Sephoras of the world head on, peel away a piece of the consumer purchasing process. Birchbox offered women a new way to sample beauty products from a variety of companies from the convenience of their homes, without having to visit a store. Turo doesn’t compete with GM. Instead, it offers people the benefit of driving without having to own a car themselves.

Illustrated with vivid, indepth and exclusive accounts of both startups, and reigning incumbents like Best Buy and Comcast, as they struggle to respond, Unlocking the Customer Value Chain is an essential guide to demystifying how digital disruption takes place – and what companies can do to defend themselves.

Direct download: 763.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

A Wild Takeoff and Bezos the Trend Trader Revisited with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 762.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Amy Webb is an American futurist, author and founder and CEO of the Future Today Institute. She is professor of strategic foresight at New York University’s Stern School of Business, and was a 2014-15 Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

Her new book is “The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity.” It is a call-to-arms about the broken nature of artificial intelligence, and the powerful corporations that are turning the human-machine relationship on its head.

We like to think that we are in control of the future of “artificial” intelligence. The reality, though, is that we–the everyday people whose data powers AI–aren’t actually in control of anything. When, for example, we speak with Alexa, we contribute that data to a system we can’t see and have no input into–one largely free from regulation or oversight. The big nine corporations–Amazon, Google, Facebook, Tencent, Baidu, Alibaba, Microsoft, IBM and Apple–are the new gods of AI and are short-changing our futures to reap immediate financial gain.

In this book, Amy Webb reveals the pervasive, invisible ways in which the foundations of AI–the people working on the system, their motivations, the technology itself–is broken. Within our lifetimes, AI will, by design, begin to behave unpredictably, thinking and acting in ways which defy human logic. The big nine corporations may be inadvertently building and enabling vast arrays of intelligent systems that don’t share our motivations, desires, or hopes for the future of humanity.

Direct download: 761.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Eyes Wide Open Brain on Neutral with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 760.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Michael interviews Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic about his new book “Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders? (And How to Fix It).” He is currently the Chief Talent Scientist at Manpower Group, co-founder of Deeper Signals and Metaprofiling, and Professor of Business Psychology at University College London and Columbia University.

There are three popular explanations for the clear under-representation of women in management, namely: (1) they are not capable; (2) they are not interested; (3) they are both interested and capable but unable to break the glass-ceiling: an invisible career barrier, based on prejudiced stereotypes, that prevents women from accessing the ranks of power. Conservatives and chauvinists tend to endorse the first; liberals and feminists prefer the third; and those somewhere in the middle are usually drawn to the second. But what if they all missed the big picture?

In Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic’s view, the main reason for the uneven management sex ratio is our inability to discern between confidence and competence. That is, because we (people in general) commonly misinterpret displays of confidence as a sign of competence, we are fooled into believing that men are better leaders than women. In other words, when it comes to leadership, the only advantage that men have over women (e.g., from Argentina to Norway and the USA to Japan) is the fact that manifestations of hubris — often masked as charisma or charm — are commonly mistaken for leadership potential, and that these occur much more frequently in men than in women.

Direct download: 759.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

The Foundation of Good Trading with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 758.mp3
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Jules Pieri is Co-Founder and CEO of The Grommet – a marketplace for unique and innovative ideas to launch. She helps entrepreneurs bypass the corporate chain by reshaping how consumer products get discovered, shared, and bought. Her new book is “How We Make Stuff Now: Turn Ideas into Products That Build Successful Businesses.”

Jules loved fine arts in school. She went to the University of Michigan and subsequently put herself on an “art diet” so she could focus her studies in other areas. She eventually took a sculpture class and saw some unique tools that were created by students. She had a light bulb moment-wanting to know how to get into the space of creating new products. Jules started her career as an industrial designer for technology companies and later moved into senior executive roles for large brands, such as Keds, Stride Rite, and Playskool.

When Jules worked at Playskool she saw a large concentration of power among the big brands and noticed innovation slipping away as big retailers like Walmart, Kmart, Target and Toys-R-Us were unwilling to buy new/fresh products. They would take on new products but only ones with slight variations or products with a little new twist. The Grommet was later formed as a response – Jules saw a new route for getting products made and she jumped on the idea. Since October 20th, 2018 The Grommet has launched one new product a day and given small brands the chance to grow among the big competitors.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Inventing
Patents & Trademarks
Innovation
Amazon and counterfeit products
New product launches

Direct download: 757.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Taking the Damn Loss with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 756.mp3
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Rich Karlgaard is a journalist, entrepreneur, and speaker. He has been with Forbes for 27 years and became publisher of Forbes magazine in 1998. Rich has written three books, “Life 2.0: How People Across America Are Transforming Their Lives by Finding the Where of Their Happiness,” and “The Soft Edge: Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success.” His latest book is “Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement.”

What was the trigger that pushed Rich to write “Late Bloomers?” Rich grew up as a late bloomer himself. He was at non-fulfilling “dead end jobs” up until his late 20’s, even with gaining a college degree. He doesn’t see his 20’s as a time of being lazy or having a lack of motivation, he simply didn’t feel like he was ready to enter the adult world. He also has two children whom he raises in Silicon Valley. He knows the added pressures being put on children and what those repercussions look like– from low self esteem to even suicide in teenagers. He felt a need to point out some of the major misconceptions adults may have about schools, tests, and the learning curve in each child.

Rich makes arguments for gap years, mandatory military service, and reforming how we look at academic tests. Americans are slipping every year compared to other counties and their youth. This has trickled into human resources and legal sides of companies that have turned to ranking employees with more tests and categorizing personalities based off data. Rich’s books, articles, and speeches also primarily focus on fundamentals of business, necessity of constant innovation, and the importance of building the right corporate culture.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Late bloomers
  • Kylie Jenner
  • SAT scores
  • Importance of high IQ
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Passion vs. Mission
  • Gap years
  • West coast offense and Bill Walsh
  • Mike Milken
Direct download: 755.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

The trading author Jack Schwager helped launch this podcast. Enjoy!

Direct download: 754.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist, New York Times bestselling author, and a weekly advice column writer for The Atlantic titled, “Dear Therapist”. Her most recent book, “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” (set for release in April, 2019), is not about getting people to go to therapy but rather to reflect on their lives – to be more open with the people around them. Lori also shows patients, through her book, that she herself is human and has issues in her own life relatable to most everyone.

What got Lori interested in psychotherapy? She had other careers leading up to becoming a therapist. She was a T.V. executive, went to medical school in her late 20’s, became a journalist, and then went back to school for clinical psychology. With help from her Dean at Stanford, she realized that she was searching for a more personal connection in her work – clinical psychology was a perfect match for her.

When most think about the idea of seeking a psychologist for help, they look at it as a sign as weakness. When it comes to emotional help people become closed off or don’t think they have a valid enough reason to be depressed. How does Lori help clients get past these social biases? She helps clients work through their problems by seeing personal blind spots and how they might be sabotaging themselves with crutches in their lives. But, most of all, she shows them how to grow through connection with others.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Calculated risk
Idiot compassion vs. wise compassion
Loneliness epidemic
“Them and Us” mentality
Speed of want
24-hour news cycle

Direct download: 753.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

The Alternative Thinking Universities Shun with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 752.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Brent Huigens is an entrepreneur in the world of trading cards. He is founder and president of PWCC Marketplace, the largest seller of investment trading cards globally with more than $50 million in annual revenue. In 1998 Brent founded PWCC to provide buyers and sellers an efficient, honest and predictable marketplace. In 2012, he set his current engineering career aside to pursue the growth of PWCC full time.

When did Brent collect his first playing card? From the early age of about five he never wanted anything other than trading cards for his birthday or Christmas. He was hooked from the beginning. He had a modest card collection growing up, but it wasn’t until his early teenage years that his collection had grown to something he was proud of. Brent had a family friend that aided him in taking his collection to the next level–that same family friend also introduced him, in 1998, to the internet and eBay. By age 20, he was selling hundreds of thousands of dollars in trading cards all while gaining two engineering degrees.

Trading cards date back to the 1800’s–originally made as a means to getting another product sold. They were produced to be put inside tobacco products, then ventured into cracker jacks and later in gum. In the 1980’s trading cards started to gain speed and were printed off on a broader scale. With the internet, eBay, and professional grading, Brent was able to see the unbridled future in the investment aspect of trading cards. Professional grading and the internet have made the trading card game more liquid and opened up the game to investors by giving them a way to trust in their investment without ever seeing it.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Card trading
eBay
Professional grading
Impact of the internet on trading cards
Auctions trading

Direct download: 751.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Eclectic Mega Episode with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio featuring:

  • William Poundstone
  • Michael Mauboussin
  • Charles Poliquin
  • Steven Pinker
Direct download: 750.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00pm EDT

Bill Wooditch is author of “Fail More: Embrace, Learn, and Adapt to Failure As a Way to Success” and a motivational speaker with a risk and financial background. He is founder and CEO of The Wooditch Group, a risk-management and corporate insurance firm. He mentors and teaches clients skills to harness the lessons of failure to create success driven opportunities. His approach is a physical, intellectual, spiritual and emotional journey based on 25 years of real life experience.

Bill’s first job out of college was at Liberty Mutual making insurance cold calls. It wasn’t a job he necessarily wanted, but it was an opportunity that he was determined to make work. On Bill’s desk, he had a ruler that read, “Activity Rules Success”. He made that phrase his motto for his work at Liberty – making the most calls he could everyday and noting what worked and didn’t. He figured that if he had the most activity and just kept pushing, he would eventually have a break though – and he did.

“What do you really want?” Bill uses this question often in presentations. Most are too afraid to do whatever it takes to make it. Perseverance has gone by the wayside and most want the easy job or quick success without the work. Bill has lots of “get tough” talks and works to put people in a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset. With everyone having their own internal version of success, Bill teaches that first knowing: 1) What you are, and 2) Who you are, is how progress is made in figuring out how to reach that success.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Venture capital mindset
Risk
The power of reading
Pre-internet
Short-term thinking
Steven King
Keith Richards
Growth mindset vs. fixed mindset

Direct download: 749.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Not One Market with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 748.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Safi Bahcall is an American technologist, business executive, and author. He has presented at over 130 banking conferences, investor events, and medical meetings around the world, as well as at leading academic institutions. His book “Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries” is out.

Safi grew up with parents who were highly acclaimed physicists. He was indoctrinated with the mindset of looking at the world and asking, “Why?” Even to this day, he has those discussions of asking, “Why” with his parents. It has given him an inquisitive perspective – always looking at things from multiple angles.

What is a loonshot? Loonshots are how big achievements, money, fame and recognition are produced. They are leaps of faith grounded in asking good questions. In keeping a questioning mindset you may find the twist that gives you the answer to what everyone else is missing. This asking mindset can be applied across all fields – military, government, technology, medicine, politics, social media, etc. Safi exposes some of these loonshots with examples going back to Alexander Graham Bell, WWII, Apple and many others.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Social media companies
Loonshots
National research system of the U.S.
Leader mindsets
Innovation
Good companies vs. Failing companies
Early stage ideas
Apple
Steve Jobs
AT&T
Bell Labs

Direct download: 747.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Trend Commandments with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 746.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Dana Cavalea is the former strength, conditioning and performance coach for the New York Yankees and author of, “Habits of a Champion, Nobody Becomes a Champion By Accident.” He started in baseball as an underperforming player, knowing he would never make it to the major leagues. In 2002, at 19 years old, he was given the opportunity to be a towel/weight room cleanup guy for the Yankee’s – he quickly jumped at the chance.

How did Dana make the move from towel guy to strength and conditioning coach? Core and functional training was just taking off in the world of sports. He committed himself to learning everything he could in that sports niche. Players would give him the chance to teach them different stretching techniques (on the side of their other training). His tips were working and players confidence in him and his confidence in himself snowballed.

Dana gave players two things other trainers weren’t providing: 1. He could find immediate ways to locate and alleviate pain. He took players like Jorge Posada and Derek Jeter and found where their pain was and gave them tips and tricks to help relieve some pain to get them on the field for their next game. 2. He built relationships with players outside of the stadium. Dana would go to breakfast, lunch and dinner with players and gain comradeship. When players know, like and trust you, you win them over.

As a New York native Dana grew up loving the game of baseball. And as a player himself, he always wanted to know what the pros “edge” was. His new book (and this podcast) is packed full of how players like Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Mariano Rivera, Mark Teixeira, Andy Pettitte, and Jorge Posada think. He shares what gives baseball’s elite players the edge needed to be a winner–lessons we can all use baseball players or not.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Importance of routine
Derek Jeter
Talent vs. work ethic in pro sports
Science behind training
Yoga
Mindfulness
Meditation
Downshifting the nervous system

Direct download: 745.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

TurtleTrader with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 744.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Eric Dugan is founder of 3D Capital Management, where he runs two primary intraday systems: short-biased S&P 500 and long-short trend following S&P 500 using multiple global markets as inputs and indicators. His systems analyze the flow of markets around the world and attempt to identify how the action in a certain market will impact the S&P during U.S. trading hours. Eric has not missed a trading day since the inception of 3D Capital Management 11 years ago.

Eric had been working construction in 1992 when his best friend moved to Chicago to trade. Shortly after his friend left, he reached back out to Eric to give him a job. December of 1992 was Eric’s first visit to Chicago for an interview with famed trader Monroe Trout, and in January of 1993 he began his first day ever trading for Trout Trading.

Because Trout was a systematic trader, there was no real need to know “what” a trader was going to do, other than trade the system. Eric’s lack of knowledge of markets when he first started did not matter because the system was king. Eric worked for Trout Trading from 1993 – 1999. When Eric started he had zero experience and within a year he was manager of Pacific Rim desk at Trout Trading. He quickly learned how to identify weakness in the stock market, which has become his greatest asset throughout his career.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Risk Control
Identifying trends
Profiting from weakness in the stock market
Trading world markets
Buying high and selling higher

Direct download: 743.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Trend Following Fifth Edition with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 742.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Daphne Chua has completed over 2,000 hours of teacher trainings and taught over 3,000 hours in classes, private sessions, special needs yoga, workshops, retreats, and teacher trainings. She is a certified yoga therapist, movement educator, body worker, Anusara Inspired™ teacher, E-RYT500 Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Provider (YACEP), and has been running her own embodiment and inquiry-based therapeutic training modules for the last 3 years.

Yoga is a practice of the body and mind connection. It helps people understand their bodies and relationships better. Most come into yoga for physical practice first, and later are drawn in deeper for the positive psychological effects. The body goes through different shapes, poses and forms that trigger the mind.

What happens chemically when leaving a massage or yoga class? What leaves a student in a state of euphoria? When working with the body there is constant chemical changes taking place. It all comes back to breath. When anxious or stressed there is shallow breathing that occurs and is concentrated in the upper chest area. Once the breath and circulation starts flowing, the mind gets more clear and focused. We begin to see the world as it is rather than over analyzing and focusing on trivial things. Breath gives fresh perspective. Throughout Daphne’s practice her therapy sessions, classes, workshops, and trainings focus on breath and awareness of the mind-body connection.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Yoga therapy
Psychology behind yoga
Addiction
Breath
Yoga tool kits
Present moment

Direct download: 741.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

A New Mega Collection with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 740.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Peter Borish is chief strategist of Quad Capital. He is a trading coach, helps recruit new traders and develop the company’s trading strategy. He also is a founding member of the Robin Hood Foundation. The Robin Hood Foundation has made great strides in their charity work and continue to do bigger and better things. Peter believes that the quality of life for those around you is much more important than the material possessions that can be accumulated.

What has been a big change over the course of Peter’s career when looking at his younger trading days up until now? When he was younger he took greater risks because he had more time to recover potential losses. He was applying innovative techniques at high costs and was ok with doing that. He tells his clients two things: 1) Never minimize the pain when looking backwards from a positive outcome and 2) If you survive, you win.

What advice does Peter give to the younger generation of traders trying to make it on Wall Street? Relationships matter. When you are younger and have success you think that success is going to continue. The markets are a humbling place and you will not always win. Peter has learned that building those personal relationships gets traders through the down times. Those connections need to be cultivated because you never know when that time will pay off.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Compounding
  • Individual responsibility for retirement
  • Tax rates
  • Robin Hood
  • Paul Tudor Jones
  • High frequency trading
  • Risk management
  • Game theory
  • AI in trading
Direct download: 739.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Creativity Wins with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 738.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Ethan Kross is a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan. His research seeks to “Understand factors enabling people to adaptively regulate triggered impulses and emotions that undermine their goals and compromise their health.” He wants to resolve a key paradox in coping literature by finding insights and translating those insights to the rest of the world.

What got Ethan into studying behavior and how the mind works? Around the age of 4 or 5, whenever Ethan would get upset, his dad would ask him to “go inside” and look within himself to figure out why he was feeling how he was feeling. For years Ethan would do this as a positive coping mechanism. When he got to college he learned that when most look inside themselves to dig deeper, this takes them to a negative place. Introspection seemed to only prolong their negative feelings. This resonated with him and started him down his current path of asking “Why?”

Much of his work is focused on social media. In early 2010 Ethan became increasingly interested in Facebook. He found himself looking around his classroom and in the hallway–relentlessly seeing students with open Facebook windows on their phone. He wondered: “Are these students happier now that they have social media in their lives?” Ethan started digging and found research that was all over the place. Some studies would say, “People who are on Facebook are more happy” and then he would come across another study saying the complete opposite. He concluded that the methods in which those studies were using to gather data were grossly inefficient.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Thinking objectively
Passive and interactive activities on social media
Experian sampling
Regulation on social media
LeBron James move from the Cavaliers
Self talk
Dealing with problems under stressed.

Direct download: 737.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Follow Your Effort Not Your Passion with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 736.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00pm EDT

Aaron Dignan is founder of The Ready, former CEO of Undercurrent and author of “Brave New Work: Are You Ready to Reinvent Your Organization?” Aaron advises management teams at GE, American Express, PepsiCo, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and The Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum – just to name a few.

What got Aaron heading down the path of innovation? From an early age he was interested in human potential. He always wanted to know: What am I capable of? Aaron started a few companies and quickly learned what an unsustainable operating system looked like. After 8 years running his company he realized there was too much work fully dependent on him and knew something needed to change if his company was ever going to grow. Aaron took a step back and searched out what would happen if he let go of the reigns a little. He looked at various systems in nature that didn’t have traditional leaders, as well as companies that had done great things operating in non-traditional ways. His company now has the mission statement of “Change how the world works.”

Aaron approaches bureaucracy in business by way of his idea of the “OS Canvas.” OS Canvas is a framework and tool that reflects and evolves an organization’s operating system through 12 critical fields: Purpose, authority, structure, strategy, resources, innovation, workflow, meetings, information, membership, mastery, and compensation. Each field can be used to clarify and provoke principles and practices upon which everything runs. With his operating system he helps companies and individuals answer the question: What is stopping you from doing the best work of your life?

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Innovation
  • Bureaucracy
  • Bottlenecks in decision making
  • Quarterly statements
  • Operating system canvas
Direct download: 735.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

If It Keeps Giving Your More Love Go with It More with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 734.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Walter Williams is a professor, economist, commentator and academic. He is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, as well as a syndicated columnist and author known for his libertarian views.

What has been the driving force behind Professor Williams and his clear economic way of thinking? He attributes it to being 83, growing up as a black man who didn’t have good grades handed to him, getting an education before political correctness was a “thing” and his education/professors at UCLA.

Professor Williams has a very clear view on the state of America via socialism, racism, feminism, free speech, and economics. So how does Walter feel about socialism? He believes nothing in this world is free. It may have the cost of $0 but it is costing someone, something, somewhere. Socialism changes the human nature of wanting more for oneself. And free speech? He feels there is increasing contempt among people. Most of mans history has a trend of arbitrary abuse and control by others. So which way is America headed?

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Socialism
Racism
Feminism
Hidden Agendas of the wealthy and political
Liberty
Censorship
Blacks and liberalism

Direct download: 733.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:00pm EDT

Speculative Wisdom with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 732.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Kyle Nel is CEO and co-founder of Uncommon Partners, served as executive director for Lowe’s Innovation Labs, co-creator of Neurons, Inc., sits on the boards of various emerging tech companies, and a faculty member at Singularity University. His newest book is “Leading Transformation: How to Take Charge of Your Company’s Future.”

Everything starts with a narrative. It doesn’t matter how old you are, what religion you practice or what part of the world you live in – people live off stories. We take all stories, fiction and non-fiction, and relate them back to our lives. Stories are how humans interpret and accept new information.

Kyle went back in time, looked at the data and saw that every big movement was backed by motivation, cognition and a story. He would give presentation after presentation and see no change in behavior by his audience, until he started putting narratives behind what he was speaking on. His audience was suddenly able to make it relatable to them, and therefore believable and actionable.

Kyle focuses on helping companies break down the steps to building a strategic narrative, breaking bottlenecks and figuring out who and where the influencers are in their business niche. After laying out the steps for his clients he writes their archetype. Kyle knows that we live in an exponential world, and need to look at the market opportunistically. Good companies that incrementally improve year to year are looking at almost certain failure. He helps guide his clients to make those exponential leaps.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Strategic thinking
Creating narratives in business
Incremental thinking
Breaking bottlenecks
Linear paths
Exponential paths
Neuroscience
Behavioral science

Direct download: 731.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Is It Reasonable with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 730.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

John Lin is founder and CEO of Grasshopper, a high frequency trading firm providing liquidity in global markets. Grasshopper was founded in 2006 and is heavily driven by technology and innovation. After graduating with an Engineering degree from Cornell University, John worked his way up from a clerk position in the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Since then, he’s lived and traded internationally in London and Tokyo, and currently lives in Singapore.

John is one of the last traders fortunate enough to have floor experience on the CME. He got a job as a runner on the CME floor in the early 1990’s and from there he learned invaluable lessons on trading, discipline and respecting the market. What made John so interested in trading in the pits? He saw the pits as capitalism ground zero.

Over the years, with technology changing, John has had to adapt his trading style accordingly. John has gone through a gradual transformation in his trading – starting with his 15 year career on the trading floor where he interacted heavily with people to 100% computer driven high frequency trading. He has taken his experience from his early years of trading and poured it into his current companies. As a trader, you are taught you’re never bigger than the market. John knows he is always listening to the market when he trades, not trying to beat it.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Trading in the pits
Nick Leeson
Singapore legal system
Barings Bank – 1995
High frequency trading
Crypto currency
Interfacing with technology

Direct download: 729.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Serendipity and Opportunity with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 728.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Tero Isokauppila is author of “Healing Mushrooms” and founder of Four Sigmatic, a natural super foods company specializing in mushroom-based drink powders. In 2012, he founded Four Sigmatic, spreading to Europe and Canada and eventually brought the business to the U.S. in 2015.

Tero grew up on a 13 generation farm in Nokia, Finland with both of his parents in the health, wellness and agriculture sphere. Some of his earliest memories were going into the forest when he was about 2 or 3 and picking herbs, berries, and mushrooms. He loved the berries but found the mushrooms so “odd.”

There is estimated to be about 1.5 million different types of mushrooms–that’s about 6 times the amount of mushroom species over plant species. Mushrooms are used for food, soil, psychedelic purposes, and medicinal. They are present in just about every aspect of life however not many realize how integrated they are in their everyday life.

There are two genres of mushrooms–functional and culinary. Generally, functional mushrooms are eaten for health reasons and culinary mushrooms are eaten for taste. Functional mushrooms grow on trees and culinary mushrooms grow in the ground. Skin, eyes, vitamin D, minerals, immune system boosters, and brain functions are all areas mushrooms can help in the body. Through Four Sigmatic, Tero has developed coffee’s, tea’s, elixirs, and other boosters enhanced with mushrooms to target all tastes and appetites.

An episode direct to health and wellness coupled with entrepreneurial drive.

Direct download: 727.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

The Self-Aware Path to Success with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 726.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Richard Sheridan is founder of Menlo Innovations and author of “Joy, Inc.” and “Chief Joy Officer.” He shares an inspirational guide for those seeking joy in the challenge of leading others and pushes readers to think, act and lead different. Too many live in quiet desperation. It’s Richard’s mission to bring those people out of those lives and thrive in whatever workplace they are in.

Before Menlo Richard was in a job that by all definitions he should have loved. He was creating art and making a real impact in people’s lives, however he was not happy. He realized he had created a culture where nobody at his company could make a move without his approval. He knew the company could not move forward any faster than him. Shedding the “smartest guy in the room image” was an important part of culture Richard wanted to instill wherever he went next.

In “Chief Joy Officer” Richard shows the importance of intertwining culture and leadership. He brings in his experience from running Menlo Innovations and his consulting elsewhere to offer a wise, provocative guide on how anyone can build leadership with a focus on joy within their own organization.

What is Richard’s definition of Joy? Joy is in service to others. He believes it speaks to the heart of the engineer. People want to see the work of their hearts, hands and minds be made and used in the world. They want to see their creation mean something to someone else and create delight. Too often people are motivated by artificial fear rather than motivated by positivity. Joy is the culture he wants everything he does to be centered around.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Extreme programing
Running experiments
Trusting your team
What is Joy?
Killing ideas vs. action oriented
Index cards

Direct download: 725.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Inside The Game Theory Mind with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 724.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Harold de Boer is a trend following legend with a consistent track record dating back to the 1980’s. His approach to the markets can be seen as, “A farmer’s common sense and mathematics while at the same time never losing sight of the underlying fundamentals.” He is currently managing director and the architect of the Diversified Trend Program, responsible for research & development, portfolio management and trading at Transtrend–with over $4 billion under management.

Harold learned statistics on the farm and has found that a lot of what is seen in markets has a analogy associated with farm life. As he was finishing up college one of his final assignments was to find a real life problem that could be fixed by using his knowledge in statistics. He contacted a commodity trading firm who had a project from him to look at relationships between meats (i.e. pork and beef) and feeds (ie. corn and soybeans). Starting there Harold first saw that there was trending behavior in the markets.

Harold has a solid trading philosophy that has been built from the ground up. He doesn’t worry himself with many things that usual market pro may worry about–like benchmarks or efficient markets. Harold looks at benchmarks as doing more harm then good in the industry. And as for efficient markets? He sees no academic proof behind the theory. Market participants make the markets move–they don’t just move automatically. Apple stock does not move from people buying lots of iPhone’s. The stock moves from market players buying Apple stock. A stock, any market, will not go up or down without participants engaging in markets making bets.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Brexit
Fundamental trading vs. technical trading
Price trends and haystacks
Media in markets
Trend following philosophy
Benchmarks
Efficient markets
Trading off the grid

Direct download: 723.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Aspire to No Goals with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 722.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Mark Miller is founder of The Legacy Lab and chief strategy officer of Team One. His work focuses on helping companies build legacies and make lasting impact on the markets they are in. Mark’s new book is “Legacy in the Making: Building a Long-Term Brand to Stand Out in a Short-Term World.”

How do those who succeed look at today’s world and move through it? Mark has come up with five principles: Put personal contribution before making money, internal culture must come first, it’s not just about growing your customer base but also collaborating with customers, lead in external culture and be the thought leader in your niche, and never stop thinking about your legacy – there is no such thing as 15 minutes of fame.

Companies nowadays must not only look at how to get off the ground, but also long term sustainability. Honest Co. is an example of a company that re-imagined a market and positioned their products to become a billion dollar success. Jessica Alba made the company a personal mission and attached her story to it–this passion spilled over into the company and fueled them to where they are now.

Other companies have become not only thought leaders but also culture leaders. Sharing technology rather than hoarding information can drive companies forward in unseen ways. Mark shares stories ranging from Ritz Carlton, Lexus, San Diego Zoo, Jagermeister, Mercedes, Apple, Microsoft and Tribeca film festival. These companies/organizations have re-imagined and helped their competitors push markets further by showing more interest in creating cultural and social change rather than dominance over their competitors.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Work for the modern age
Wow stories
Legacy companies
Re-inventing markets
Social and cultural change through business

Direct download: 721.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Can You See the Landscape with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 720.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Jonathan Tepper is co-author of “The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition.” He is chairman of Variant Perception, a macroeconomic research group catering to asset managers and co-founded Demotix, a citizen-journalism photo newswire.

Tepper notes — Google and Facebook control over 70% of all search and linkage within the internet. Their algorithms are biased and guide users to go where they want them to go. Most need Google or Facebook to login to certain websites. So on a platform as vast as the internet, where is the competition?

There’s a lot of smart, wealthy, entrepreneurial focused people around the world – why are they not fighting back? There is virtually no interest by people in Silicon Valley to get into the search engine game. Any small competitor that tries to insert themselves into the industry gets bought out by their larger sized competitors. Jonathan encourages capitalism and companies becoming monopolies because of organic growth. Unfortunately, this is rarely how companies grow. Monopolies are usually formed due to political advantages and strong economic footholds. Jonathan describes the economy right now as “fake capitalism.”

What will it take to overturn a Google or Facebook or Amazon? Will they be dominating for the next 30 years? The central point of evolution is competition – the struggle for survival. In a perfect world, companies with the best and strongest traits would survive while the old and fat companies would die off rather than continue to thrive because of crony capitalism. Only time will tell if these mammoth sized companies will continue to push boundaries and prosper or if a younger more creative company will overthrow them.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Technology monopolies
Capitalism
Airline monopolies
Anti trust laws
Federal Reserve
The banking system
Fake capitalism
The Antitrust Paradox
Patents

Direct download: 719.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Time to Blame the Computers Again with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 718.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Follow the Opportunity with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 717.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Daniel Crosby is a psychologist, behavioral finance expert, asset manager and author of several books. His most recent book is “The Behavioral Investor.” Daniel’s background in behavioral psychology has taught him to look at markets as a backdrop to view human behavior in a real world setting.

Why did Daniel decide to write his latest book? What was his motivation? Daniel is a regular speaker at conferences. At those speaking engagements he was continuously hearing misinformation presented about behavioral biases in trading. He wanted to set the record straight about how to tap into emotions and explain how much personalities really play into trading.

As a psychologist who works in the markets, Daniel gets real time information on how people are feeling by looking at how price movements fluctuate. Daniel cites a study showing that 94% of the time rules beat out discretion in the markets. Betting on your “gut” almost always leads to ruin. Trading off rules doesn’t just lead to a better trading record, it also leads to less brain damage and heartburn. Daniel found about 200 different biases that can harm up trading. Within those 200 biases Daniel has created four main categories: ego, emotion, attention, and conservatism. He shows through facts and data how systematic trading is better on the pocket book as well as fostering a healthier lifestyle.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Functional fictions
Evolution
Human behavior in market price
Loss aversion
Behavior bias
Contrarian perspective

Direct download: 716.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Ann Mei Chang is author of “LEAN IMPACT: How to Innovate for Radically Greater Social Good.” She was a technology executive with more than 20 years of experience at Google, Apple, and Intuit, as well as a range of startups before she pivoted her career into the private, social and non-profit sectors. She now works with companies around the world to help streamline growth and innovation.

Innovation is necessary for any company to grow. Ann helps non-profits and more risk-adverse companies properly take risks to improve their process. From global development to technology companies – there is a lot of uncertainty to combat against, grants to be filled as well as shareholders to appease. When tackling big issues investors and the public want to see tangible results quickly. Ann shows a balance between thinking big, keeping an eye out for what can be done better and keeping track of ever changing demand. Audacious goals are important, but you also need a process and plan of what is going to get you to that audacious goal.

Innovation is not only about creating the latest new thing, but rather taking something that is already created and making it better. Google wasn’t the first search engine, but they made it better. Facebook wasn’t the first social network, but they improved on it and made the experience better. Ann gives the example of a 700 year old invention – eyeglasses. With how long eyeglasses have been around, there is still about 2.5 billion people without access to them. Vision Spring is a non-profit that was created to reach these people without access. Vision Spring’s initial business plan wasn’t reaching as many people as planned and money was running out quickly. With continuously being open to making pivots in their business model, they continue to grow and reach larger and larger amounts of people. It is all about adaptability and innovation within whatever company your are at – non-profit to big technology.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Political grandstanding
Process vs. outcome
Understanding your base customer
Projecting bias
Non-profit work

Direct download: 715.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

You Are Responsible with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 714.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00pm EDT

The Trend Following Mindset with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio. A holiday reminder on great thinking!

Direct download: 713.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Bradley Hope is a finance and malfeasance reporter for the Wall Street Journal and his latest book is “Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World.” Bradley is a Pulitzer finalist and winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for international reporting and the TRACE International Award for Investigative Reporting.

“Billion Dollar Whale” profiles a man named Jho Low – a young Malaysian man from a relatively wealthy family. He grew up attending the best boarding schools and finished up schooling at The Wharton School. During his time at Wharton he created a private equity group. He was able to get some of his wealthier friends and their parents to throw money into the fund. From a young age he knew what made people tick and had a talent connecting with very wealthy and strong political figures. Jho eventually got an audience with the Prime Minister of Malaysia to set up a fund for the Prime Minister’s campaign – this is where the real story of Jho Low starts to unfold.

Jho quickly went from a guy with a million or so dollars to worth about $700 million over night. He began throwing extravagant parties, renting private yachts and planes, and rubbing elbows with the world’s elite. He started buying giant stakes in companies and was even able to borrow 6 ½ billion from Goldman Sachs. The extent of how much he has stolen and from who is still largely unknown. Jho Low figured out how the world works, develop relationships and was the king of understanding that you could buy just about everything. With the scandal still unfolding in real time, Bradley’s book has created waves in countries around the world.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • The Wolf of Wall Street
  • Sovereign wealth funds
  • Money laundering
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Banking compliance
Direct download: 712.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Daniel Peris is author of “Getting Back to Business: Why Modern Portfolio Theory Fails Investors and How You Can Bring Common Sense to Your Portfolio” and a portfolio manager at Federated Investors. Before transitioning into asset management, Peris was a historian focused on modern Russian history, but now self identifies as a business investor.

Daniel’s clients tend to be more conservative investors that approach markets from a business perspective rather than a passive investment approach. His main focus is to help clients make better business like decisions about markets. Not everyone has the time or desire to be an active investor, however Daniel hammers the point that if you don’t want to take responsibility for your own trading, there are plenty money managers for hire that will align with investors needs.

Daniel has strong views on economic practices like the efficient market hypothesis (Eugene Fama) and modern portfolio theory. Daniel sees the modern portfolio theory as particularly outdated. Modern portfolio theory was a hypothesis developed by Harry Markowitz in his paper “Portfolio Selection,” published in 1952. It is an investment theory that investors can build portfolios to optimize or maximize potential return based on a prescribed level of risk within the market. This theory governs the typical investors portfolio and is the most influential economic theory in finance and investment today. Daniel argues in his book and on the podcast that this system was developed in the 50’s and does not connect to 2018 investing.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Modern portfolio theory
Efficient market hypothesis
Value investing
Momentum investing
Diversification
Portfolio selection
Defining risk

Direct download: 711.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Peter Boettke is economist of the Austrian School. He is currently an economics and philosophy professor at George Mason University; the BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism, Vice President for Research, and Director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at GMU. His newest book is “F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy (Great Thinkers in Economics).”

Peter got hooked on economics during college after being hired for his first job – digging pools. He saw taxes being taken out of his pay and personally felt the negative effects. The philosophy behind why his checks were being garnished didn’t sit well with him. Rather than be frustrated, he got fascinated with the way economics worked and quickly saw there was something obviously wrong with the way government was ran. Along with signing up for all the economics classes he could, Peter went to the library and read. He had “a-ha” moments in those reading sessions that has molded him to be the economist he is today.

Michael and Peter touch on a broad scope of topics including: What is Peter’s perspective on President Trump’s view of trade wars and tariffs? Should intellectual property be protected? What is rent seeking and how does it relate to Jeff Bezos? What separates the American entrepreneurial spirit from entrepreneurs overseas?

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Trade deficits
Trump politics
Politics in the marketplace
Zero sum game
Jeff Bezos and rent seeking
The market for privileges
Merchant class mentality

Direct download: 710.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Paul Britton is a portfolio manager at Apollo Systems Research Corporation.

What got Paul going down the trend following path? In high school Paul’s dad put him into a stock that went from $5 to $60. He took his profit and put money into a couple more stocks that turned out to be winners as well. These lucky trades peaked his interest in markets. Shortly after making these initial trades, Paul’s dad also gave him a copy of “Reminiscences of a Stock Operator.” He started working and looking at data trying to see if he could get a system of his own to work. He quickly learned that you can play around with entry and exit points, markets, etc., but as long as you pick up on the big trends and ride them until they lose–that was the #1 way to make money.

Paul lets the experts in different markets such as milk, coffee, orange juice, sugar, stocks, currencies, etc. “tell him how to trade” by showing their opinions hidden within the price. “You don’t need a fundamental expertise to be trading any of these markets.” Paul is in 110 different markets. He trades strictly off price and has no idea outside of price “why” stocks are going up and down. Every strategy they develop at Apollo Systems Research Corporation has to work on many markets and have maximum diversification. Paul loves adding diversity to his portfolio where other trend followers may not be.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Momentum bias
Let your winners run
Fundamental trading
Diversification
Global macro trading
Compounding
Supply and demand

Direct download: 709.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

One of the Omaha Guys Lays It Out with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 708.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Deliberate Practice with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 707.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

My reach back in time to a blast from the past on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 706.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Howard Marks is an investor, writer and author of “Mastering the Market Cycle: Getting the Odds on Your Side.” After working in senior positions at Citibank early in his career, Howard joined The TCW Group, Inc. in 1985. He led groups within the company responsible for investments in distressed debt, high yield bonds, and convertible securities. After 10 years at The TCW Group, Inc. he co-founded Oaktree Capital Management.

Howard got into high yield bonds in August of 1978. This was a turning point in financial history because up until this moment only good companies could borrow money. High yield bonds opened the market to more risky companies and also showed Howard a different way of looking at markets. The first company he worked for had a strategy of buying stock in the 50 most successful companies in hopes they would continue to go up forever. With the advent of the high yield market he saw himself making good and steady money off of the worst/most risky companies–turning everything he had been previously been taught upside down.

Howard has lived through over 50 years of financial history and with his new book he has gone back hundreds of years to examine and study cycles. So how does Howard define a cycle? There are many different cycles–cycles in science, speed, people inhabited, etc. Cycles in the financial world are produced by people and are created by their feelings. The cycle represents a fluctuation in something around a mid-point, but time-frames and reasons for fluctuations do not repeat themselves–except for in human behavior. Looking back hundreds of years there are a few things that are underlying in every financial boom–too much optimism, too much money chasing, and too much risk aversion.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

High yield bonds
Financial cycles
Sub prime bubble
Dot-com crash
Continued learning by reading
Risk management
Decision making

Direct download: 705.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Run Rabbit with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 704.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Allison Shapira is founder and CEO of Global Public Speaking LLC and author of “Speak with Impact: How to Command the Room and Influence Others.” She teaches at the Harvard Kennedy School and offers keynote speeches, workshops, and executive coaching for Fortune 500 companies, government agencies, and nonprofits around the world.

What was the process for pulling research together for her new book? Conducting interviews? Pulling from personal experience? Allison has been teaching on public speaking for over 15 years. She has hundreds of stories spanning across just about every industry – giving her the depth of knowledge needed for this book. Allison saw trends of what worked, didn’t work and how to apply that information to the real world and real people. Public speaking is a critical skill in the professional world and it is a skill that needs training and coaching to become good at. Having knowledge and expertise on a subject alone does not make you a good speaker. Speaking clearly and concisely is a craft that demands hours of practice to feel comfortable.

Allison has had some brilliant and academically distinguished mentors, however the people she has learned from and been inspired by the most are in workshops. She is inspired by getting people “over the hump” and seeing scenarios that prove that public speaking is a skill that everyone can execute.

How does she get students over that “hump?” Vocal variety, eye contact and body language are three non-verbal communication elements that are key in giving an engaging presentation. Also, when people believe in what they are speaking on and are passionate about it, they seem to be less nervous and have less anxiety. A good presentation should feel like a conversation with the audience. With that being said, there is no such thing as perfection when it comes to public speaking. There is always room for improvement – Practice, practice, practice.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Authenticity
Public speaking
Karaoke singing
Vocal variety
Eye contact
Body language

Direct download: 703.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Las Vegas Roundtrip with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 702.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Jeffrey Gitomer is an author, professional speaker, and business trainer, who writes and lectures internationally on sales, customer loyalty, and personal development. He is best known for “The Little Red Book of Selling” and his newest book, coming out at the end of October, is “Truthful Living: The First Writings of Napoleon Hill.”

Jeffrey was introduced to the Napolean Hill Foundation about 10 years ago and volunteered to start writing for their newsletter with an article every Friday. Napoleon Hill was the founding father of positive attitudes. In 1917 he had a course in advertising and selling. At the end of every course he would lay out positive thinking. When the Napolean Hill Foundation found these writings, what they call “After the Lesson Visits by Napolean Hill,” the foundation approach Jeffrey about writing a book outlining his teachings. Jeffrey did not hesitate to say yes – and after years of pining over these lecture notes, his newest book was formed.

What energizes Jeffrey and motivates him to write? He loves what he does. Every day is a great day for him. He doesn’t have two days that are alike, or two books alike, or two speeches alike. He is most excited about “What is next?”. Jeffrey lives in the moment but is ready for tomorrow and his ideas, strategies, and connections – they are all in place to set him up for success in the present day and the next.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Personalization
Service as the foundation of success
Truthful living
Communication

Direct download: 701.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Tom Basso is back for episode 700. Tom is featured across Jack Schwager’s “Market Wizard” series and most famously known as “Mr. Serenity.” He was featured on episode 400 of Trend Following Radio with a mega 4 ½ hour episode, and today he is back for this new episode. Now retired from managing client money, Tom was president and founder of Trendstat Capital Management. He became a registered investment advisor in 1980, a registered commodities advisor in 1984, and was elected to the board of the National Futures Association in 1998.

Although Tom has been retired for over 15 years he still gets emails daily from aspiring traders. While on vacation with his wife, they came up with a more efficient solution to answering all these emails. Tom decided to start an educational platform that he more candidly describes as a “Tom Basso brain dump into a website.” He has had 28 years of experience managing money and over 40 years of managing his own money. With all that knowledge, his new website addresses what he feels new and old traders alike struggle with. All content on his website will be free aside from his personal training videos and a narrated version of his book “Panic-Proof Investing.”

What is it about the individual that is so important in trading? How do you become the best trader you can be? How does exercise and diet play into trading? How do you separate self worth from your net worth? How do you stay young in your energy? Michael and Tom keep their conversation on trading today more philosophical rather than technical.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Trend following philosophy
Separation of net worth from self worth
How to view winning trades vs. losing trades
Staying mentally young
Brooks Koepka vs. Tiger Woods
Dealing with stress in the markets
Social media stressors

Direct download: 700.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Tiffani Bova is author of “Growth IQ: Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business.” She has a unique background, with 20 years of experience spread between start-ups and fortune 500 companies. Tiffani has put together a first hand look at what it takes to start and run a successful business as an entrepreneur.

How did Tiffani get her start in business? Early in her career she would ask executives and CEO’s constantly for little tid-bits of knowledge–she wasn’t afraid to step out of her comfort zone and ask for help. That feedback and confidence building was the cornerstone to becoming who she is today. What gave Tiffani the courage to talk to these leaders and say “please help and give me some advice?” Sports played a huge role. Win or lose, she learned how to conduct herself and hold her head high no mater what the turnout of a game was.

Growth IQ is a dense book with many case studies. Tiffani researched about 30 companies from all backgrounds including Kylie Cosmetics, Honest Co., and Under Armor–using them as examples to show how to build and sustain successful businesses. She also shows companies hitting forks in the road and how they overcame. Every case study may not be useful to everyone but there are lessons to be learned from all.

Tiffani stresses that it is sometimes the little changes made that make all the difference between a failed venture or a successful one. What are some good questions to reflect on if your business is not where you think it should be?: Is the order you are presenting your product off? Are you selling to the wrong demographic? Are you giving customers the wrong experience?

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Flexing your confidence muscle
The power of now
Selling to your demographic
Buddhism
Growing a business

Direct download: 699.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

The Whipsaw Guy with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 698.mp3
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Jerry Parker is back on the podcast. He is the founder of Chesapeake Capital, was one of the original TurtleTraders trained by Richard Dennis and has had unbelievable success over his four decade career. Jerry brings to the table a straightforward way of breaking down how trend following works.

Trend following relates to everything – from Wall Street to baseball. One of Jerry’s early heroes was John W. Henry, a successful trend following trader and now owner of the Boston Red Sox. Michael and Jerry break apart how John W. Henry and others cross the trend following mindset into sports and beyond.

What is Jerry Parker’s worldview? “It’s dangerous out there and you cannot predict it. Stocks are not superior and they are not the go-to investment all the time. Pay attention to the trend. Protect yourself. Be humble, conservative and worried about risk.” He doesn’t see that view changing anytime soon for anyone – including investors. What do investors want? And do they know what they want? Jerry knows he can’t make everyone happy but he try’s to provide appropriate risk control for his clients without missing out on too much profit.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Baseball analytics
Lumpy returns
Crisis alpha
Having a process and sticking to it
Value Investing
Bobby Axelrod

Direct download: 697.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Michael explores new research showing pharmaceutical statins do nothing to help prevent medical problems relating to heart disease–if you have no risks. For years people have believed there was a special pill to save them from high cholesterol. Turns out, there is no special pill to help–exercise, eat well, get adequate sleep–these things are how you improve your health. It’s about personal responsibility. Trust yourself? Or trust the system that has been proven wrong time and time again?

$400 billion dollars has been lost in crypto currencies. Michael shares an example of a man who lost 95% of his $120,000 investment in Bitcoin. When Bitcoin started going down he tried diversifying into other crypto currencies. He said his learning process was like “solving the plot of a murder mystery.” The notion that he could use fundamental data and figure out how to trade Bitcoin was all wrong. Jerry Parker commented on this story by saying, “He should have studied trend following.” Having a stop in place, and looking at the data would have saved him from his financial ruin.

Statins and cryptos connect? You bet.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Big pharma
Statins
Trusting the system
Personal responsibility

Direct download: 696.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Scott Belsky is an American entrepreneur, author and early-stage investor best known for co-creating the online portfolio platform, Behance, Inc. He is author of several books with his latest being “The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture.”

How did Scott get started as an entrepreneur? He started his first business with two partners selling paper products. He bootstrapped his way through the industry for the first few years – accepting no outside help. It wasn’t until five years into building his company that he had to move in the direction of needing to raise funding. However, at that point Scott and his partners had already built their company at their own pace and on their own terms.

When starting a new business there are a lot of questions that come up: How do I prepare for the long term? How do I hire someone? How do I fire someone? How do I structure team communication? How do I become a better decision maker? How do I continue to make a better product? Scott’s new book is a guide to help answer all these questions.

Uncertainty may be one of the biggest roadblocks in deciding to start a business. What does uncertainty mean to Scott? Uncertainty is a burden that must be processed continually. The more you embrace doing something on your own, the more you will learn how to cope and process that fear.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Seth Godin
Entrepreneurship
Enduring lows and optimizing highs
Uncertainty in business
Starting a business
Staying engaged
Self awareness

Direct download: 695.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Ken Kocienda was a software engineer/designer at Apple for over fifteen years and is now the author of “Creative Selection: Inside Apple’s Design Process During the Golden Age of Steve Jobs.” After being introduced to the internet in 1994 he taught himself computer programming and made his way through a succession of dot-com-era startups, before landing a job at Apple in 2001. He worked on software teams responsible for creating the Safari web browser, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch.

Ken entered college with the mindset of becoming a history professor or even a photographer. He had various interests in college, however none of them were in the technology sphere. He moved to Japan after college for a few years and upon moving back to the United States, he was introduced to the internet for the first time and instantly intrigued by it.

Ken interviewed for Apple in spring of 2001 before the iPod had been released--Apple was still relying on the Mac as their main revenue stream at the time. Ken had loved Apple products since he saw his first Mac in 1984 so when he was hired on at Apple it was surreal. His first job was to make Apple a web browser of its own – what we all know as Safari today. Later, in 2004, he joined the team to make the software for the iPhone’s touchscreen operating system, among other products.

Inspiration, collaboration, craft, diligence, decisiveness, taste and empathy are seven attributes Ken uses to describe how Apple became the success story they are today. Steve Jobs and Apple chased perfection and demanded nothing short of it.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Pyramid of demos
Steve Jobs thought process
Apple company philosophy
Completely present in the moment
Reality distortion field
Creative selection
Green Bay Packers and Vince Lombardi

Direct download: 694.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Terence C.M. Tse is an educator, speaker, advisor and commentator. He is a co-founder of Nexus FrontierTech and co-author of “Understanding How the Future Unfolds: Using Drive to Harness the Power of Today’s Mega Trends.” His mantra is “You can’t predict the future, but you can be ready with a plan.”

Terence’s book focuses on a term he calls “Presentcasting.” He does not promote forecasting but rather teaches people to look at what’s in front of them and see how things are unfolding in current time. He has created the acronym DRIVE – defining 5 interrelated mega trends: demographic and social changes, resource scarcity, inequalities, volatility, complexity and scale and enterprising dynamics. These are the five directions Terence points clients in when they start thinking about improving their lives.

What is one way to step outside the box and get a better look at trends unfolding? Travel. Traveling is crucial to seeing the speed in development and change happening around the world. Desire to climb the economic ladder is not exclusive to one culture or another. Everyone is looking for the same economic wealth. Most cultures promote the desire to get a college degree, however this leaves young adults lacking the ability to take risks. The education system trains students to study, take exams well and work in certain defined jobs. However, in today’s world learning how to deal with uncertainty, have an entrepreneurship mindset, and take a little risk are the skills that will help young adults get ahead an prosper.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Preparing of uncertainty
Entrepreneurship
Economics abroad
New technology
Rise of the internet
Disappearance of white collar jobs
Student loans

Direct download: 693.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Bob Woodward Spins John Belushi with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 692.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Gregory Aldrete is a professor of history and humanistic studies at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay, where he has been teaching since 1995. His emphasis is on rhetoric and oratory, floods in Rome, ancient Greek and Roman history, and daily life in the Roman world. What was life like in ancient Roman times? How did people do things in the ancient Roman Empire? These questions are what fascinates Gregory and keeps him moving forward in his research.

What relevance does ancient history have to us today? We are ever presently walking in the footsteps of those who came before us and until you understand the history of prior civilizations, you cannot fully understand who you are. It is the blunders and the achievements of our ancestors that have built up what we see today. There is not much that can be taken away from talking heads in the news and on Twitter, but much can be learned from the study of history.

How does Gregory describe a military blunder? To be a true blunder, the situation must have been avoidable. It could have or should have turned out a different way, but because of someone’s mistakes it didn’t. One of the biggest failures of leadership, which consequently leads to blunders, is overconfidence. Michael and Greg give examples of catastrophic blunders ranging from the Battle of the Little Big Horn to Napoleon and Hitler.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Butterfly effect
Overconfidence in leadership
Napoleon’s biggest blunder
Battle of the Little Big Horn
Hitler
D-Day
Technology and understanding its potential

Direct download: 691.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Speed with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio. Michael goes back to his archives for two of the fastest men in the world. Risk takers extraordinaire!

Direct download: 690.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Safe is Not Really Safe with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 689.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Bob Enck is the CEO of Equinox Funds and has overseen all operations at the fund since March of 2007. Prior to joining Equinox Funds, Bob worked for about 20 years with large, highly regulated health care organizations including Bristol-Myers Squibb as well as with more entrepreneurial venture capital funded organizations.

When was Bob exposed to trend following for the first time? What was his a-ha moment? While he was doing merger and acquisition work, a couple of his friends consistently would ask him to look over literature from their firm to get input. His first exposure to trend following came from that research. The concept of trend following clicked with him and “just made sense.” His real light bulb moment was realizing that Equinox funds could make money in up and down markets. His friends soon asked him to join their company as CEO.

What is so unique about Equinox Funds? They have paved the way in researching and developing alternative investment strategies for clients through unique investment vehicles. They created the first multi-strategy managed futures mutual fund–the Frontier Fund. In a field where many companies tend to become complacent and set in their ways, Equinox brings innovation and creative thinking to the market. Bob and Michael explore the full range of issues across the alternative space.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Trend following in up and down markets
Drawdowns
Trend following performance
Discretion
WTF
Forecasting

Direct download: 688.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Peter Leeson is an economics professor at George Mason University and is known for connecting rational choice theory with unusual domains. He looks at human behavior as a series of puzzles that are being solved by those involved. He focuses his studies on everything from bizarre rituals and superstitions to the behavior of Caribbean pirates. Peter’s work has also been quoted as “Freakonomics on steroids.”

How does Peter come up with some of his “crazy” ideas? He likes to have a broad library to read from, particularly history books. As he reads he comes across a lot of practices that may seem outlandish to most, but fascinating to him. From there he digs deeper and finds meaning in certain practices through religion, economics, politics, etc.

Throughout Peter’s work it is clear that the main motivator driving behavior is incentives. What happens when we have government incentives vs. private incentives? Michael and Peter finish the podcast talking government intervention, wealth creation and cultural behavior driving capitalistic efforts.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Somalia pirates
Anarchy vs. government
Medieval law and order
Trial by jury
Logic of incentives
Street hustlers

Direct download: 687.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Brooks Koepka has won three major golf championships in the last 14 months. He has had the emotional fortitude to push through the obvious pressures of being on the top, especially for being only 28 years old.

Brooks wasn’t able to go pro right out of college and moved to Europe to get his PGA tour card. He wasn’t thrilled about having to go overseas to get his chance at the pros in the U.S., but with a chip on his shoulder he used that as motivation to push forward, excel and win championships.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Emotional fortitude
Operating outside the system
Extreme focus
Cryptocurrency crashes

Direct download: 686.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Lawrence Krauss is a theoretical physicist and cosmologist, professor at Arizona State University, director of its Origins Project and author of bestselling books: “The Physics of Star Trek” and “A Universe from Nothing.” He is an advocate for science based data, public policy based on sound empirical data, and scientific skepticism. His goal is to reduce the influence of superstition and religious dogma in popular culture. His most recent book is “The Greatest Story Ever Told–So Far: Why Are We Here?”

When did Lawrence first discover he was a skeptic, someone who would think outside the box? He was encouraged to think for himself from a very early age. He grew up Jewish but slowly grew out of ideas that surrounded the religion. No real a-ha moment, just gradually decided that religion wasn’t something he could believe in. In 6th grade he also began doing poorly in school. His parents moved him to a different school where he subsequently did much better. Lawrence knew that he wasn’t a different person, but it was other people’s expectations that wavered how he performed. From then on, he was conscious of not letting others opinions of him bring down his performance.

Richard Feynman has played a large role in Lawrence and his studies. He is a great example of someone who did not let other’s hinder him. Feynman was charismatic, intelligent, and excited about all things new – he didn’t rely on other’s opinions. The charisma Feynman possessed, combined with the genius of his science made him the legend.

How does Lawrence describe science? It is a process rather than a collection of facts. Science helps to establish what is true from what is non-sense. It also breaks the sensible from the non-sensible. Lawrence brings this mindset into religion taking a controversial stance saying, “God is completely irrelevant to science.” He fiercely believes that the idea of religion was created as a way to explain how the world worked before we had the technology and science to know how it actually works.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Big bang theory
Religion in science
Simulations
Skepticism

Direct download: 685.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

While Michael was visiting the United States recently his assistant sent him some inspiring old Time Magazines and Saturday Evening Post Magazines. Some that particularly stood out? A 1959 Time Magazine with a story about Nicolas Darvas and a 1976 Time Magazine profiling Richard Dennis when he was 27 years old. These two men laid so much of trend following thinking and to see some original articles in print was inspiring.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Modern American male
Trend following fundamentals
Philosophy behind trend following
Black swans
Fundamentals
Ego in trading

Direct download: 684.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Gabriel Radvansky studies mental model theory for human memory and cognition. He strives to understand how people create, organize, store and retrieve mental models. Also, how younger and older adults differ on their use of mental models.

What triggered Gabriel to study cognition memory? He was hooked from the day he took his first introductory psychology class. His teacher’s description of what a psychologist did instantly caught his attention and from there he knew the path he wanted to go down. His original major in college was physics, he then switched to AI computer science and moved into psychology. Because of his other majors, he comes at psychology from a scientific approach.

Gabriel has done extensive research on how a person’s environment changes ones memory. Why does walking through doors make you lose your train of thought? Moving from one environment to another, your brain naturally wants to leave some things behind and pick up new things. Different rooms represent different memories and your brain has been trained to adapt. Humans have the same type of trigger when it comes to computer windows and stories within a book – when a character goes from one location to another, information gets forgotten and lost.

Memory is not about the past – we have memories so we know what to do now, and to help us know what to do in the future. What helps one memory stick more than another? The more emotion linked to a memory, the more vividly you remember those events. Memories with an emotional consequence trigger better and faster than those with no emotion linked to them. What are some steps you can take to help your memory? Write things down and have as many broad experiences as you possibly can.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Event cognition
Work environments
Forgetting curve
Long term vs. short-term memory
Environments where our brains learn best
Memory research

Direct download: 683.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Trend Following Deep Dive with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Direct download: 682.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Bradley Campbell is a sociologist whose research focuses on moral conflict — clashes of right and wrong and how they are handled. His work primarily looked at genocide arising from large-scale interethnic conflicts , but recently he has begun to examine smaller-scale conflicts on modern college campuses. Since about 2013 he has studied the phenomena of micro aggression complaints, calls for trigger warnings and safe spaces. He views this new era as, “Manifestations of ongoing moral change and the clash of different moral ideals.” He addresses these topics in his book, “The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Micro aggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars.”

How did Bradley shift from macro aggression and genocide around the world to micro aggression on college campuses? He was always interested in answering, “Why do people have conflict? And what causes someone to handle that conflict in a particular way?” How are conflicts handled with the legal system? When someone has a grievance, do they avoid them? So what makes someone choose violence over law or avoidance?

With every generation, comes a different way of being taught how to handle conflict. Where one generation may have been taught to have thicker skin and not take things so seriously, today’s kids have been taught to take offense to every micro insult that might make them feel uneasy. Where there is more equality and in places that value diversity, there tends to be more sensitivity to insults – therefore lots of micro insults tend to add up to big offenses.

Are college campuses a place that should display robust conversation? Or should they be a place where free speech is censored? Bradley argues that, if anything, college campuses should encourage free speech. Unfortunately, words are being viewed as literally violent and should be censored. Michael and Bradley end the conversation on where college students stand on Trump and politics today.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Hate crimes
Genocide
Micro aggression
Macro aggression
Victim culture
Trigger warnings
Trust in government
Safe spaces
Free speech

Direct download: 681.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:11pm EDT

“Risk Savvy: How to Make Good Decisions” by Gerd Gigerenzer is one of Michael’s favorite books from the last 10 years. Today, Michael reaches into the archives and plays an interview with Gerd Gigerenzer.

Gerd is a psychologist who studies the use of bounded rationality and heuristics in decision making and investigates how humans make inferences about their world with limited time and knowledge. He is director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition (ABC) at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Daniel Kahneman vs. Gigerenzer’s views
Heuristics vs. statistics
Medical check-ups
Taking risks
Instincts vs. expert advice
Relative vs. absolute risk
Benjamin Franklin’s ledger
Heuristics
Unconscious intelligence

Direct download: 680.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Jeffrey Miron is an economist, served as chairman of the Department of Economics at Boston University, currently teaches economics at Harvard University, and holds the position of Director of Economic Policy Studies at the Cato Institute.

Jeffrey came to be a libertarian from an economics standpoint rather than philosophical, with Milton Friedman at the helm of his influencers. What got Jeffrey heading down the liberty path? Economics teaches that there are unexpected consequences with interventions. Jeffrey randomly started working on drug legalization in college and came to the conclusion that ramifications of outlawing anything would apply to all markets whether it be guns or drugs.

America spends about 50 billion a year as a country to fight drug laws- couple that with missing out on 50 billion a year in taxes if drugs were legalized and one can see the economic missteps. In addition, studies show there would be a decrease in crime, corruption and less interruption of people being able to use drugs medicinally with drug legalization. Michael and Jeffrey not only touch on the economics of libertarianism in America, but around the world.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Cato Institute
Libertarianism
Bootleggers
Ramifications of drug prohibition
Modern Chinese commerce
Ripple effect of bankruptcy
Bernie Sanders campaign
Donald Trump campaign

Direct download: 679.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

A Peaceful Easy Feeling with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 678.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Mark Blyth is a political scientist from Scotland and a professor of international political economy at Brown University.

What influenced Mark early on? John Maynard Keynes was his foundation. He also was growing up through the permanent recessions of the 1980’s and learning first hand about pitfalls in the economy. He quickly saw how the macro economy was so much different than the micro and how studying the economy as a whole was more important than just looking at the individual.

Mark called the Donald Trump win for Presidency in June of 2016. Why? Trump was willing to acknowledge there was a problem. He was dramatically different and played to the individual rather than big business. In 2015 Wall Street bonuses were twice the amount of the total wages of people earning minimum wage. Since that 2015 statistic, the inequality has only gotten greater. Trump gave people hope that things can change – that he could change them.

What are some macro steps that can get the U.S. economy heading in the right direction today? Dissolve monopolies and raise corporate taxes creating long-term productivity gains. Because of tax ride-offs a monopolized economy has been created. The government has allowed and engineered large businesses to run America and it’s time to re-arrange the model. Another problem? Americans have become dependent on passive investing and don’t know what to do when volatility happens. They have become blind to risk, due to lack of volatility for the last 10 years. Michael and Mark end on the question: “Can the economy sustain the next 10 years like this?”

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Trump campaign
Raising interest rates
Tax cuts
Infrastructure
General data protection regulation
Black swans
Passive investing
Efficient market hypothesis

Direct download: 677.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Markets and Profit with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio.

Direct download: 676.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Jerry Muller is a professor of history at The Catholic University of America, where he has taught since 1984. His latest book is “The Tyranny of Metrics.” Quantifying metrics can be a good thing, however, it can easily go too far and have great consequences.

Jerry sees pitfalls of focusing too much on metrics everywhere – schools, hospitals, even venture capital. Children gear their learning toward beating a test rather than intellectually developing their mind. Doctors fixate on standardized performance measures, rewards and punishment, and publicized accountability. The system encourages and sometimes requires doctors to game the system. Venture capitalism, the very field where creativity should prosper, tends to foster an anti-creative atmosphere. Investors want to see data to back up a new product so they can see proof of a future profit. The problem? New innovations don’t have data because they have never been seen before in the marketplace.

Using metrics in schools, hospitals, and business can be extremely useful depending on what context it is used, but alone they are not enough. Human development as well as human experience should be weaved into the equation. Michael and Jerry finish the podcast up talking metrics in China, how it has lead to gaming the system and taken a toll on developing research.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Intrinsic motivation
Tyranny of metrics
Metric fixation
Metrics in law enforcement
Metrics in health industry
Managerial ideology
Powerpoint presentations
Metrics in China

Direct download: 675.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Michael plays three epic interviews with Ed Seykota, Martin Lueck and Jean-Philippe Bouchaud profiled in chapter’s 12, 13 and 14 of his newest edition of Trend Following: How to Make a Fortune in Bull, Bear and Black Swan Markets.

Ed Seykota was originally profiled in the classic book “The Market Wizards.” Seykota has played a pivotal role in the growth of trend following trading for 40 years.

Martin Lueck holds an M.A. in Physics from Oxford University and currently is the Research Director and President of Aspect Capital. Lueck was originally with Adam, Harding and Lueck Limited (AHL), which he co-founded with Michael Adam and David Harding.

Jean-Philippe Bouchaud is founder and Chairman of Capital Fund Management (CFM) and professor of physics at École polytechnique.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Govopoly
Systems trading
Diversification
Behavioral economics
Death of trend following
Exploiting vs. exploring
Behavioral biases
Risk

Direct download: 674.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

Christopher Ryan is best known for co-authoring “Sex at Dawn.” The book deals with the evolution of monogamy in humans and human mating systems. In opposition to what the authors see as the “standard narrative” of human sexual evolution, they contend that having multiple sexual partners was common and accepted in the environment of evolutionary adaptedness.

What was the start of Christopher going doing his path? One of the more pivotal moments was when he was an undergraduate in college. He was able to skip his junior year of college and subsequently hitchhiked to Alaska. Before that journey to Alaska, he thought the world was a dangerous place. Once he got outside his bubble and met strangers, he learned how kind and generous people were. It shifted the way he thought about life and the world.

After graduating he spent his 20’s and 30’s backpacking through Asia and South America. His a-ha moment was realizing that most of what he was told about the world was bullshit. Governments have an agenda and prop up their society to make other places seem less superior. Christopher quickly saw that the cultural message telling us that it’s a “dog eat dog world” was not true.

There are different attributes that everyone shares. What is universal? What do we all share? Consciousness, sexuality, comedy, etc. these are all things that translate across cultures and continents. Learning about these things is what excites Christopher and why he continues to learn, study and teach.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

Monogamy
Hunter and gatherer society
Agricultural revolution
Culture of women sexuality
Sexual transmitted disease
War on masturbation
Social groups

Direct download: 673.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT

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